The week in recalls | Hooded sweatshirts, 1.2 million Chuck E. Cheese toys, Click bracelets and balls

The week’s news in product safety…

Hooded sweatshirts with drawstrings recalled By Burlington Coat Factory

Hazard: The hooded jackets and sweatshirts have drawstrings through the hood and/or waist, which can strangle or trap kids inside. The clothes do not meet federalguidelines issued in 1996 to help prevent children from strangling or getting entangled on the neck and waist drawstrings.

Incidents/Injuries: None yet.

Description: Recalled brands include Aeropostale, Apple Bottom, Deere Park, Disney, Gray Wolf, Jonathon Stone, Kani, Miletta, New York, Ruff Stuff, Sergio Benini. For a complete model list, see the CPSC recall.

Where you bought them: Burlington Coat Factory and other retailers nationwide from 1995 through September 2009.

What to do: Take out the drawstrings and the clothes are safe to wear.

Fun Stuff Recalls Children’s Toys Due to Choking Hazard

Hazard: The small balls on the end of the toy’s arms can detach, posing a choking hazard to young children.

Incidents/Injuries: Just one report of a ball detaching in a 21-month old girl’s mouth, but no injuries.

Description: Click Armband Bracelets, Klick Klick Balls and BoBo Balls, all manufactured by Fun Stuff.The bracelets and balls are made of stretchy, rubber material with hard plastic, colorful balls at the end of the toy’s arms. The BoBo balls have a flashing lighted ball encased in the stretchy material. For a full list of recalled model numbers, see the CPSC recall.

Where you bought it: Beach resort stores nationwide from January 2009 through August 2010 for between $2 and $5.

What to do: Take the toys away from young children and contact Fun Stuff at (888) 386-7833 for a full refund.

Chuck E. Cheese’s recalls light-up rings and star glasses

Hazard: The plastic casing on the toys can break into small pieces and expose the batteries. Batteries can be poisonous if eaten.

Incidents/Injuries: There have been two incidents involving the Light-Up Rings, one in which a child swallowed a battery and one in which a child inserted a battery up his nose. There hav been no reported incidents involving the Star Glasses.

Description: The light-up rings measure 1 1/8 inches across and come in several colors – blue, green, purple, yellow, and pink. Theywere included in a promotional package offering during parent-teacher association conventions. The star glasses,part of a birthday package, are made of red translucent plastic and have the words Chuck E. Cheese’s painted on the side.

Where you got it: Chuck E. Cheeses between April 2009 and June 2010.

What to do: Return the light-up rings to any Chuck E. Cheese’s and receive four Chuck E. Cheese tokens plus your choice of either a $1.00 refund or a Soccer Promo-Cup. For the star glasses, Chuck E. Cheese is offeringeither a refund of $4.99 or a Flashing Hands prize product. For more information, contact Chuck E. Cheese at (888) 778-7193.

Chicago Parent Editorial Team
Chicago Parent Editorial Team
Since 1984, the Chicago Parent editorial team is trained to be the go-to source for Chicagoland families, offering a rich blend of expert advice, compelling stories, and the top local activities for kids. Renowned for their award-winning content, the team of editors and writers are dedicated to enriching family life by connecting parents with the finest resources and experiences our community has to offer.
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