The essential skills all children need to be successful

The Self-Aware Parent


 
 

By Cathy Cassani Adams

Contributor and Blogger
 

We want our children to be successful, and we focus our attention on what we believe they need most.

Education, grades, sports and other extracurricular activities tend to be our primary focus, the things that take up most of our time and thought.

This is understandable because these things are indeed important. The ability to learn, think and process information is essential for independence, and sports and activities provide skills to enhance our ability to socialize and relate.

These things are important, but so are our interpersonal skills. Skills that connect us and make us human, the ones we too often take for granted.

To learn these skills, our children need to see them at work in our society. But unfortunately, our society is failing at demonstrating their importance.

For example, listening. Wouldn't it be great if our kids knew how to be great listeners? Listening is such an invaluable skill, a skill that connects us and demonstrates respect for others.

But instead, our children see a government that is challenged to listen or compromise, and they are surrounded by people who need to win an argument rather than be open to a new idea.

Or how about compassion? What if we helped our kids develop an understanding of others and an ability to see from another's perspective? If kids really understood what it felt like to walk in another person's shoes, some of our social issues, like bullying, would be minimized.

But instead, our kids watch as we rip apart celebrities and criticize people who are different from us. They watch it in the media, and unfortunately, sometimes even in their own homes.

What about self-understanding and respect? What if every kid knew they were unique and special? What if they understood that they had individual gifts and talents and whatever they felt passionate about was moving them in the direction of their dreams?

Instead, we tell kids to be like us or be like others. Instead of trusting their instincts or creative expression, we tell them who to be, how to be and what to say, while simultaneously putting down our own looks, our own decisions and our own choices.

These vital things have to be demonstrated and taught. If we viewed them as more important than grades, teams and awards, then many of our challenges would dissipate and we would see a shift.

Not only would our children have more enjoyable youths, but they also would grow up with skills to change the world, skills that would lead to a creative and heart-centered investment in our society.

If we focused on role modeling and exposing our kids to more listening, compassion and self-respect, a lot of our own stress and anxiety surrounding parenting would probably fade away.

Because we would know, deep down, that these are the true keys to success, the essential skills for a meaningful life and a thriving world.

 
 
 







 
 
 
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