Throw those old medications out

 
 

By Dr. Lisa Thornton

Columnist
because the humidity can be damaging. Store medicines in a cool, dry spot out of reach of children.
Start your makeover by gathering all medications. Discard any medicines that have expired or no longer needed. This includes antibiotics, which may be toxic after their expiration date. Discard any old cough and cold medications for children under 6 and Ipecac syrup. These products are no longer recommended.
Don't throw medications down the toilet because they can get into the water supply. Instead, remove pills or liquids from their original container. Be sure to remove any personal identifying information from prescription labels. Dump meds into a sealable plastic bag filled with old coffee grounds or cat litter. This will discourage animals from ingesting it. Add a little water so the pills dissolve. Seal the bag and throw it in the garbage.
Another option is to use the National Prescription Take Back Event, sponsored by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. Check with your pharmacist for information. Some medications, such as powerful narcotics, are disposed of by flushing. This will be noted on the label.
After you get rid of the old stuff, be sure you have some basic supplies on hand. Here's what I recommend for every home:
Essential medications and supplies:
Ibuprofen (the active ingredient in Motrin and Advil) for pain, fever or inflammation.
Acetaminophen (the active ingredient in Tylenol) for fever or pain (never give your child aspirin because of the risk of Reye's Syndrome).
Diphenhydramine (the active ingredient in Benadryl) for congestion and mild allergic reactions.
Antibiotic ointment (like Neosporin) for minor scrapes.
A digital thermometer, Band-Aids (assorted sizes), tweezers, small scissors, nail clippers, cotton swabs, Peroxide and latex-free gloves.
Optional medications:
Hydrocortisone cream 1% for rashes.
An antacid (like Maalox or Tums).
Calamine lotion (for bites or stings and rashes from poison ivy, etc.).
It's helpful to write the use of each medication right on the label with a Sharpie. I do this in my home with all medications that come in tubes because it's easy to mix up the athlete's foot cream with the anti-itch cream. Group the medications by use in your cabinet.
Inside the cabinet, post a list of emergency phone numbers, such as poison control (1-800-222-1222), your pediatrician, pharmacist and ER.
Now you're prepared to tackle the bumps, bites and colds that are a part of every normal childhood.

January is a great time to move out the old and make way for the new, so it's the perfect time to get rid of old medications and organize your medicine cabinet.

The first thing to clarify is that medication should not be kept in a bathroom cabinet because the humidity can be damaging. Store medicines in a cool, dry location safely out of reach of children.

Start your makeover by gathering all medications. Discard any medicines that have expired or no longer needed. This includes antibiotics, which may be toxic after their expiration date. Discard any old cough and cold medications for children under 6 and Ipecac syrup. These products are no longer recommended.

Don't throw medications down the toilet because they can get into the water supply. Instead, remove pills or liquids from their original container. Be sure to remove any personal identifying information from prescription labels. Dump meds into a sealable plastic bag filled with old coffee grounds or cat litter. This will discourage animals from ingesting it. Add a little water so the pills dissolve. Seal the bag and throw it in the garbage.

Another option is to use the National Prescription Take Back Event, sponsored by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. Check with your pharmacist for information. Some medications, such as powerful narcotics, are disposed of by flushing. This will be noted on the label.

After you get rid of the old stuff, be sure you have some basic supplies on hand. Here's what I recommend for every home:

Essential medications and supplies:

Ibuprofen (the active ingredient in Motrin and Advil) for pain, fever or inflammation.

Acetaminophen (the active ingredient in Tylenol) for fever or pain (never give your child aspirin because of the risk of Reye's Syndrome).

Diphenhydramine (the active ingredient in Benadryl) for congestion and mild allergic reactions.

Antibiotic ointment (like Neosporin) for minor scrapes.

A digital thermometer, Band-Aids (assorted sizes), tweezers, small scissors, nail clippers, cotton swabs, Peroxide and latex-free gloves.

Optional medications:

Hydrocortisone cream 1% for rashes.

An antacid (like Maalox or Tums).

Calamine lotion (for bites or stings and rashes from poison ivy, etc.).

It's helpful to write the use of each medication right on the label with a Sharpie. I do this in my home with all medications that come in tubes because it's easy to mix up the athlete's foot cream with the anti-itch cream. Group the medications by use in your cabinet.

Inside the cabinet, post a list of emergency phone numbers, such as poison control (1-800-222-1222), your pediatrician, pharmacist and ER.

Now you're prepared to tackle the bumps, bites and colds that are a part of every normal childhood.

 
 



 
 
 
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