How could they?

 
 

Tamara O'Shaughnessy

 

From the editor
I wasn’t sure what to expect as I headed into the elevator prepared to meet three drug users. That’s not completely true. Actually, I figured I knew just what to expect: these were drug users after all. We’ve all seen them on the street or portrayed on TV.

Not exactly the makings of a Norman Rockwell painting.

Probably like many parents, I wondered what kind of person would risk their kids’ lives for a quick high. How could these moms do such a thing to their kids?

But walking into that conference room at The Women’s Treatment Center, I found myself facing moms with shy smiles who could just as well be gathered for a PTO meeting instead of talking about the power of drugs over their lives.

These three moms, Kelly, Shonnetta and Denna, eagerly opened themselves up to some pretty unpleasant questions and dredged up bad memories for no other reason than to help other parents and community leaders understand just how important places like The Women’s Treatment Center are. Senior Editor Liz DeCarlo and I agreed not to publish their last names to protect theirs’ and the kids’ identities. (See the story on page 55.)

As we listened to the women tell their stories one by one around the large conference table, it became clear how much love for their kids motivated them, just as it does for every mom and dad out there. Whether by environment or heredity, though, these women lost sight of what really matters and gave in to addiction—until now.

Not every mom leaving the center will succeed and stay clean, of course. But those who do will be working to break the cycle of violence and drugs that threatens too many people in the next generation. I felt huge joy when, in a follow up e-mail, I heard all three are succeeding.

To increase the number of women who rid themselves of addiction once and for all, The Women’s Treatment Center needs everyone’s help. Donations of items many of us have around our homes are an easy way to help these moms begin a new life and secure a drug-free future for their kids.

 

 
 







 
 
 
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