For your reading pleasure

 
 

Jennifer Gilbert

THE BABY GIZMO BUYING GUIDE: FROM PACIFIERS TO POTTIES … WHY, WHEN AND WHAT TO BUY FOR PREGNANCY THROUGH PRESCHOOL, by Heather Maclean with Hollie Schultz, Thomas Nelson, $16.99.

When I got pregnant, my husband expected me to be an expert at knowing exactly what we needed for our baby because of my experience working at a parenting magazine. While I definitely had a head start, I have to say that my go-to guide so far is The Baby Gizmo Buying Guide. Written by the creators of www.babygizmo.com, this book has honest opinions about everything you could possibly want or need for your little one. Clueless about what makes a perfect play yard? Want to make sure you get the safest child safety seat? This book will tell you everything you should look for and what you should avoid.

The chapters are divided up by product category, making navigation easy. I ended up reading the book cover to cover, though, because Maclean’s style is conversational and fun to read. Plus, at the end of each chapter is a quick list of buyer’s tips, which is great for brushing up before making a purchase.

My husband and I recently registered for our baby gear and
Baby Gizmo was in my head the whole time, saving me from registering for things we really don’t need and helping me decide between the hundreds of options in front of us. In my opinion, this is the only baby gear book you need.

 

 

GREEN BABIES, SAGE MOMS: THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO RAISING YOUR ORGANIC BABY, by Lynda Fassa, NAL Trade, $14.

The studies and headlines about commonly found chemicals that can hurt your unborn child or new baby are frightening. Whether you’re just looking to become more environmentally conscious for your new addition or you want your family to become completely organic, this book has it all.

While many books that tout a "green" philosophy come off sounding preachy (and totally unrealistic), this one is clearly written by a mom who’s run the gamut from being a single model to a totally organic business owner and mom of three. Each chapter offers tips for raising your bundle of joy naturally, from clothes to food to house care and includes specific product and brand recommendations. Although some of her tips sound a little daunting (i.e. lobby your local government to stop using chemical pesticides), every chapter ends with a quick summarization of "evergreen" (for the totally organic), "sage green" and "pea green" tips so there’s something for everyone.

I may not be a total green convert after reading Fassa’s book, but I’m definitely taking some of her suggestions to heart (I think our household cleaners are next in line for an all-natural makeover). Here’s my lingering question, though—when will organic products become affordable for everyone and not just those in a certain income bracket?

 

 
 





 
 
 
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