Can-do kids


 
 
 
His friends have started calling him Penny Boy.

But that's OK with 11-year-old Adam Smith. Smith made headlines last month when he donated a rare 1909 wheat penny worth about $3,000 to his school's penny drive raising funds for the new Children's Museum in Oak Lawn.

Adam says he and his dad, Bob Smith, didn't think twice about donating the coin that came into the family two decades ago. Adam says he only thought about what the penny could do to help the museum add new exhibits for other kids.

"I do tend to give because I like to help people," the Covington Elementary School fifth-grader says. He's already making plans to set up a trust fund to help raise more money to give to charity.

But Adam has his sights set firmly on helping others beyond pennies and dollars. Since age 8, he's been experimenting with herbal medicine creations in the family's Oak Lawn kitchen.

He says he sometimes practices on his sister, Alexis, 16, who he says likes his aromatherapy concoctions, and he especially wants to help his grandma and grandpa with his special brews.

But he sounds almost indignant that his parents-Bob, a former Oak Lawn police chief, and Susan, a librarian in Orland Park-will only let him help his friends with his marigold ointment for bee or wasp stings rather than offering his other remedies.

"It's the thing I can do best," he says about herbal remedies.

Asked what he'd like people to know about him, Adam comes back with a not so simple answer. "I want people to know I care about them."

Tamara L. O'Shaughnessy

The Children's Museum plans to keep the rare penny to allow its value to increase. Since Adam's donation, people are showing up at the museum with jars of pennies to donate. People interested in helping the museum may donate online at www.cmoaklawn.org or stop by the museum, 9600 E. Shore Drive, Oak Lawn.

Can-do kids

Do you know a great kid age 14 and under who's done something amazing? E-mail names and information to [email protected]

4 questions

What do you want to be when you grow up?

An herbal doctor or a coin collector. I'm thinking about being both.

Do you have any special talents?

I'm a really good speller. Everyone thinks I'm a walking encyclopedia.

What's your favorite food?

Cream of chicken soup (out of a can).

What are your other interests?

Tropical fish, learning to play the clarinet (he says he wants to be a great clarinet player like his sister), chess, soccer, playing with friends, watching TV and sleeping late on weekends.

 

His friends have started calling him Penny Boy.

But that's OK with 11-year-old Adam Smith. Smith made headlines last month when he donated a rare 1909 wheat penny worth about $3,000 to his school's penny drive raising funds for the new Children's Museum in Oak Lawn.

Adam says he and his dad, Bob Smith, didn't think twice about donating the coin that came into the family two decades ago. Adam says he only thought about what the penny could do to help the museum add new exhibits for other kids.

"I do tend to give because I like to help people," the Covington Elementary School fifth-grader says. He's already making plans to set up a trust fund to help raise more money to give to charity.

But Adam has his sights set firmly on helping others beyond pennies and dollars. Since age 8, he's been experimenting with herbal medicine creations in the family's Oak Lawn kitchen.

He says he sometimes practices on his sister, Alexis, 16, who he says likes his aromatherapy concoctions, and he especially wants to help his grandma and grandpa with his special brews.

But he sounds almost indignant that his parents-Bob, a former Oak Lawn police chief, and Susan, a librarian in Orland Park-will only let him help his friends with his marigold ointment for bee or wasp stings rather than offering his other remedies.

"It's the thing I can do best," he says about herbal remedies.

Asked what he'd like people to know about him, Adam comes back with a not so simple answer. "I want people to know I care about them." Tamara L. O'Shaughnessy

The Children's Museum plans to keep the rare penny to allow its value to increase. Since Adam's donation, people are showing up at the museum with jars of pennies to donate. People interested in helping the museum may donate online at www.cmoaklawn.org or stop by the museum, 9600 E. Shore Drive, Oak Lawn.

Do you know a great kid age 14 and under who's done something amazing? E-mail names and information to [email protected]

 
 







 
 
 
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