By the numbers

 
 
 

Breast feeding is big

 

Since 1955 new mothers have been surveyed to find out whether they are feeding their babies breast milk, commercially available infant formula or cow’s milk.

The survey, conducted by Ross Products, the division of North Chicago-based Abbott Laboratories that makes Isomil and Similac formulas, found breast-feeding is on an upswing, despite a decline from 1982 until 1990, according to the latest 2000 poll.

Here is a look at breast-feeding by the numbers:

1,400,000 total surveys mailed by Ross in 2000.

31 percent, response rate from mothers who received the survey.

68.4 percent, the portion of breast-fed newborns in U.S. hospitals during 2000, the highest rate recorded by the survey.

51.5 percent, the portion of breast-fed newborns in U.S. hospital during 1990, the lowest rate recorded by the survey.

64.8 percent, the portion of Illinois mothers who breast-fed their babies in the hospital.

30.8 percent, the portion of Illinois mothers who still were breast-feeding at six months.

31.4 percent, the portion of U.S. babies still being breast-fed at six months of age.

66.2 percent, the portion of new mothers who worked full time outside the home and breast- fed in the hospital.

68 percent, the portion of new mothers not employed outside the home who breast-fed in the hospital.

22.8 percent, the portion of mothers who work outside the home full time and were still breast-feeding after six months.

35.4 percent, the portion of mothers who do not work outside the home and were still breast-feeding after six months.

80 percent or more of new mothers living in Alaska, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah and Washington breast-fed their newborns.

-- Cindy Richards

 
 







 
 
 
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