The Witchin' Halloween Guide 2010: Shoes

 
 

By Maria Pilar Clark

Contributor and blogger
 

Hoofing it around the neighborhood at breakneck speed while hauling a pillowcase-turned-treat-bag bigger than the average toddler can be hard on little feet. Kids don't want to spoil the spooky costume fun by wearing everyday sneaks and parents don't want to spend money on overpriced one-offs.

Cosmotot's Witchin' Halloween Guide continues with shoe picks that meet in the middle, and that won't lose their appeal come Nov. 1.

With Batman, Scooby-Doo, Spongebob Squarepants, Lightning McQueen, Buzz Lightyear and Mickey Mouse among their extensive line up, Crocs gives kids the cool factor they crave and offers parents a decent price tag. The clog-look shoes are a staple at our house, thanks to a supportive orthotic footbed, slip-resistant soles, and the fact I can throw them in the sink with a little dishsoap and water to make them look new again.

The crocsilite material used to make the shoes is anti-microbial and odor-resistant, and ventilation holes accomodate plenty of Jibbitz shoe charms - an added bonus for a kid with character faves (think animated movie characters and more).

Parents looking for hand-painted kicks to complete a handmade costume need not look further than Monkey-Toes.

Their playful line of animal- and insect-themed shoes goes limited edition (available only until October 31) come Halloween, with special glow-in-the-dark eyes painted on each pair. All the paint used is non-toxic, and though they take up to two weeks to be shipped out, the final product is worth it, considering that the styles can easily go from blackboard to blacktop later.

Nowa Li mocassins make it easy for kids to share the happy haunts at home with their Monster and Retro Robot styles. The soft, sock-like tops stay put while keeping little legs covered, and the hand-stitched non-slip leather soles make sure no one takes a header while playing an indoor version of Ghost in the Graveyard.

 
 







 
 
 
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